?

Our First Session?

Poll closed Oct 14, 2016.
  1. Countdown Town (Mystery turned Horror)

    33.3%
  2. The Silent Cathedral (Conspiracy Suspense)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. The Bestiola (Time-Constrained Adventure)

    16.7%
  4. Weremen of a Feather (Puzzle Horror?)

    33.3%
  5. Volley of Despair (Siege Survival)

    16.7%
  6. A Bad Omen (Action Adventure)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Manhunt (Action Mystery Survival)

    16.7%
  8. The Missingmen (Supernatural Mystery)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. A Tortured Artist (Horror Chase)

    16.7%
  10. Black Sun (Apocalypse Survival)

    33.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.

SingleCelledPsyk's D&D Group Invite

  1. SingleCelledPsyk

    SingleCelledPsyk Active Member

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    Ever wanted to live out your fantasies in the facade of another person who has no personal consequences? Too bad, you already have the Internet for that. What I offer is the prime rib meat of a poor deli in a small town, a tabletop gaming experience of a fiercely mild intensity. I am talking about D&D, 5th Edition to be exact. Now that we have game nights and Discord works almost universally now, those who would like to join D&D games or even those who might not want to (but should reconsider) come and post here and I'll get working with you to create a character and get into a campaign. EDIT: The presence of a mic is irrelevant, though thoroughly advised.

    Now, what is D&D? You don't know, okay, then watch this video = D&D Explanation

    Though its portrayal is incomplete as they are far many more facets and enjoyable parts of the game, please don't expect anything more. Leave yourself open to the surprise of maybe enjoying it. If you don't have time to listen to it, do it in parts, you most likely will not regret doing so.

    Now, onto the boring legal stuff:
    GAME:
    1. Be serious about the game
    2. Feel free to be creative & silly, just don't get everyone killed nor kill everyone
    3. Be spontaneous, be creative, use the environment, ask questions
    4. Communicate, keep your DM informed. Talk to other players about what you want to do before the game starts
    5. NO CHEATING. You have one chance, that's it. Ultimate Sin
    6. Meta-gaming is the same as cheating, your character doesn't know, (s)he doesn't know it
    7. Keep food nearby, sessions range from 2 1/2 hours to the occasional 4
    8. PLEASE make all characters in front of or with your DM. This prevents cheaters who boost their stats (Trust but verify)
    9. THIS. IS. ROLEPLAAAAAAYIIIING! But we won't kick into a pit if you decide that's not something you want to pursue, but please try when you can
    10. Participate, those who have DM'd before know the hell of preparing sessions and writing compelling stories and characters (it takes hours, sometimes days). Respect the DM by keeping the main part of your attention on the game, if you miss something then oops
    CONDUCT:
    1. No disrespecting other players regularly
    2. No In-Party fighting. If the majority wants to go one way and do one thing, go with them. Only split the party when you need to
    3. It's okay to keep secrets in-game, just inform your DM when you do
    4. These games will be mostly Homebrew, so ultimitely your DM has last say on how the rules work
    5. No arguing with the DM. State your claim, explain your reasoning, accept the outcome. In the end it's a game, don't get your knickers frazzled over it
    6. Because we all have a dirty brain lobe somewhere, take precautionary measures. No ERP. Romance, sure! Risque PG-13 material, sorry
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    What to Expect:
    You are not obligated to do anything more than one session if you decide this is not for you. This is a hobby and it's not insane to think it just may not be for some people. Don't feel like you need to commit. With this in mind, I tell you what the game is about and finally what is expected of you if you want to keep playing.

    The Game:
    The game is made up of a group of people, usually 3-5 of them, sitting around a table for 2 1/2 to 4 hours, though in this case we'll be over Discord. Like a board game; everyone participates, everyone is involved. Instead of taking turns while moving pegs across cheap cardboard, you'll be moving pegs called "characters" over something even cheaper; the imagination. In this vast landscape you control your character like a puppet, dictating what they're doing and how they're doing it. Since this game is made up of many choking-hazard pieces, let's look at them individually:

    Your "Character"
    Your character is much like an improv class role. You are told by your nose-ringed, pink haired instructor, "You're a distraught housewife at home come to realize her husband, Leroy, has been cheating on her with her brother, he walks in, action!" You assume the role of the wife and your friend Steve, who dragged you into doing this class, takes the role of the husband, Scene! You freeze, what do you do? You do the first thing you think of, you accuse him, how dare he! Leroy acts calm and pretends to put down a briefcase. It takes a little bit, but eventually your sentences aren't slow and taking a lot of time to form, you're in character, thinking the same things this wife might think. You begin moving and making gestures with your words, creating a persona of an angry middle-aged woman. After some interesting and emotionally fueled conversation, Leroy takes out an imaginary knife from the briefcase, stating he took his work as a cook home with him. Oh no, Leroy the Cook takes an imaginary stab at you, you cry out in pain, sinking to the floor as you bleed out.

    Playing your characters is no different, it's uncomfortable at first. But as things get going you'll get into character, acting like this imaginary person. In D&D you take the time to play this character and develop a unique persona for them, instead of moving around you simply say, "I do this...." Then you roll. The roll decides the outcome, whether you succeed or fail. Someone called the DM tells you exactly how you failed.

    The "DM"
    The DM is the referee and storyteller. (S)he's the nose-ringed, pink-haired instructor. Only you get to decide what character you want to be. The instructor instead tells you where, that you're at home, and who does what, Leroy walks in. During your conversation the DM will add in things, "You hear the neighbor kids turn up their loud music." You then react to that input. Or maybe the wife (you) went to go grab liquor from the cabinet, the DM tells you the cabinet is empty. You wanted to know more about the character you're playing so you ask the instructor, "Where are we?" She shrugs and says, "You're in New Orleans in a middle class home, nothing fancy but you got marble counters." Which makes you think, "Do we have a kid?" "Sure, how about 3," says the instructor. You adjust. This is the DM. Among narrating what your actions cause and the environment around you they are also Steve. They act with you and play all the characters you don't.

    The third responsibility is to use the rules to determine how things play out. It would be unfair if one person was left with the power to decide everything or tell you that you can't do that. So the DM rolls to decide, the higher the number the better. Sometimes he will make you roll to see how well you did, then tell you the outcome.

    The "Rules"
    The rules tell you how good you are at something and how to go about deciding whether you succeeded or not. They state the laws that govern the universe and provide the framework to work off of. If Steve took out a lightsaber from his briefcase, sure it might make things interesting, but it removes the challenge unique to D&D. You have:

    Items, you can use these. Some are weapons, some are potions that restore and heal wounds. Some could be tools to shape your environment, like a pickaxe or shovel. You decide how to use them.

    Abilities, these are the things you know how to do. Just like you know how to read, write and make biased comments, you know how to do certain things. These are given based upon your "class". You can use them to do anything..... within reason of course.

    Your Character, they are real, in an imaginary sense. Anything you could physically do here in the real world, so could they. That also means they react in the same way. That knife stab from Leroy/Steve really hurt and now you have a knife in you. In a little bit you might bleed out, in D&D the scene doesn't end. You keep going on and you track it with a piece of paper called your "Character Sheet". This scrap of dried liquefied wood shows you everything that defines your character. They, imperfectly, translate their physical and mental ability into numbers for the DM to use.

    How to "Stab"
    Combat in D&D is different than just moving your arm to stab the kitchen into your wife who knows too much. You can dodge out of the way, you can move, but only as much as your character would be able to. This is where D&D becomes the board game, you takes turns and declare what you want to do. The whole system ends up being a lot like chess, but don't worry, unlike chess it isn't so confusing or frustrating to learn. You get the hang of it pretty quickly once you've been in a battle or two.​

    The Next One(s):

    Please, if want to keep playing then get a Players' Handbook. I can link you to a free PDF or give you mine if need be. In the book is all the information for your "Abilities", determined by your "Class". It's useful because it also contains all the rules for playing. Don't be intimidated by the size, it's a reference book, you only ever use a small portion of it. All of it is there in case you get a special case situation and don't know what to do on the part of rules. Like, what if someone is transformed into a mouse? If they're possessed by a ghost is the ghost stuck in mouse form? Who knows but the Handbook.
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    Our Players:
    • Varnathin
    • DeanQueen
    • TNTCtrm
     
    #1
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2016
  2. Spuddylicious

    Spuddylicious Seraph - Community Management & Development
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    I like the sound of this! Might join up if I get the chance, although am quite busy at the moment!
     
    #2
  3. TNTCtrm

    TNTCtrm Seraph - Events
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    Id definitely be down with playing with you
     
    #3
  4. Icebound_Fusion

    Icebound_Fusion Active Member

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    I'm down, if I can get my mic working. I'm actually in a DnD group with a couple of friends at school right now. Tiefling Warlock, multiclassing into a Summoner.
     
    #4
  5. SingleCelledPsyk

    SingleCelledPsyk Active Member

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    In case anyone is wondering I'd love to be a Player if someone else feels up to the task of DMing. Of course it's fine if I'm the only one for now. Also, I made changes and added a description for the game and what it's about! @Varnathin should have a less vague understanding of it now, maybe.
     
    #5
  6. NomadicMerchant

    NomadicMerchant Active Member

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    What version are you running? I do have fairly recent copies of Pathfinder stuff.
     
    #6

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